Timer:  

Adjectives and Adverbs

Rule 2:
Keep related words together.

Adjectives should be placed next to the things they describe, and adverbs should be placed next to the action or the other modifiers they describe. The most common problem with keeping related words together is the simple misplacement of an adjective, especially adjectives such as only, just, about, or almost.

Examples of adjectives not placed next to the words they are meant to describe:

• I almost have enough money to start a new company.
• Please bring the speaker a cold glass of water.
• He only has $5 to spend at the store.

Notice how much more exact the sentences sound when the modifiers are placed close to the words they describe

Examples:

• I have almost enough money to start a new company.
• Please bring the speaker a glass of cold water.
• He has only $5 to spend at the store.

People often mistakenly place relative clauses too far from the words they are intended to describe. Remembering to keep related words together will help you to avoid mistakes.

Examples of mistakes:

• The man is here who quit.
• The report is very good that he wrote at home yesterday afternoon.

These sentences would have a greater effect if they were rewritten.

Examples:

• The man who quit   is here.
• The report that he wrote at home yesterday afternoon is very good.

Previous PREVIOUS Top of Page
TOP OF PAGE
NEXT NEXT